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Accreditation/Credit Designation

Physicians' Education Resource®, LLC is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Physicians' Education Resource®, LLC, designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Acknowledgement of Commercial Support

This activity is supported by an educational grant from Agios Pharmaceuticals and Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation.

Rapid Reviews in Oncology®: Practice-Changing Data in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Rapid Update From Atlanta Online

Release Date: December 21, 2017
Expiration Date: December 21, 2018
Media: Internet - based

 

Activity Overview

Physicians’ Education Resource®, LLC (PER) is pleased to present an archived CME activity of the continuing medical education (CME)-certified activity titled “Rapid Reviews in Oncology®: Practice-Changing Data in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Rapid Update From Atlanta.”   This program is an archived version of the live-streamed interactive webcast held on December 14, 2017 and led by world renowned Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) experts: Richard Stone, MD; Naval Daver, MD; and Etyan Stone, MD.

The Rapid Reviews in Oncology® format presents an archive of a live-stream, interactive broadcast from a professional studio to rapidly update physicians on data that was recently presented at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting in December 2017. The program consists of an in-studio panel discussion between AML experts highlighting implications and applications of ground-breaking data in the treatment and management of AML presented at the 2017 ASH Annual Meeting. 

The Rapid Reviews in Oncology® program on AML from ASH brings conference-caliber education to the convenience of your screen!

Acknowledgement of Commercial Support

This activity is supported by an educational grant from Agios Pharmaceuticals and Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation.

CME Activity Table of Contents

  • Introductions and Opening Remarks on AML
  • Advances in FLT3-Targeted Agents in Patients With AML
  • New Developments in IDH Inhibition in AML
  • Expanding the Array of Therapeutic Targets in AML

Instructions for This Activity and Receiving Credit

  • You will need to login to participate in the activity.
  • Each presentation may contain an interactive question(s). You may move forward through the presentation; however, you may not go back to change answers or review videos/content until you finish the presentation.
  • At the end of the activity, “educational content/video files” will be available for your reference.
  • In order to receive a CME certificate, participants must complete the activity.
  • Complete the posttest and pass with a score of 70% or higher, complete the evaluation and then click on request for credit. Participants may immediately download a CME certificate upon completion of these steps.


Target Audience

This activity is directed toward medical oncologists, oncologist/hematologists and hematologists who treat patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Fellows, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other healthcare professionals involved in the management of leukemia patients are also invited to participate. 

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, you should be better prepared to:

  • Explain current treatment pathways for the management of patients with AML
  • Assess recent clinical trial findings that have evaluated novel approaches for patients with AML
  • Place new evidence concerning emerging strategies for the management of AML in the context of evolving treatment paradigms in the field

Faculty, Staff, and Planners' Disclosures

Moderator

Richard Stone, MD
Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Chief of Staff
Director, Adult Leukemia
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA

Disclosure: Consultant: Abbvie, Agios, Amgen, Argenix, Arog, Astellas, Celator, Celgene, Cornerstone, Fujifilm, Janssen, Jazz, Juno, Karyopharm, Merck, Novartis, Ono, Orsenix, Otsuka, Pfizer, Roche, Seattle Genetics, Sumitomo, Sunesis, Xenetic. Board Member and Advisory Committee: Actinium. Research Funding: Agios, Novartis.

Faculty

Naval G. Daver, MD
Associate Professor
Department of Leukemia
Division of Cancer Medicine
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, TX

Disclosure: Grant/Resaerch Support: BMS, Pfizer, Daichi, Sunesis, Incyte, Servier, Immunogen, Karyopharm. Consultant: Novartis, Otsuka, Pfizer, BMS, Celgene, Agios, Jazz, Incyte, Servier, Immunogen

Eytan M. Stein, MD
Assistant Attending Physician
Leukemia Service
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY
 

Disclosure: Grant/Research Support: Novartis, Agios, Celgene

The staff of PER® have no relevant financial relationships with commercial interests to disclose.

Disclosure Policy and Resolution of Conflicts of Interest (COI)

As a sponsor accredited by the ACCME, it is the policy of PER® to ensure fair balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all of its CME activities. In compliance with ACCME guidelines, PER® requires everyone who is in a position to control the content of a CME activity to disclose all relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. The ACCME defines “relevant financial relationships” as financial relationships in any amount occurring within the past 12 months that creates a COI.

Additionally, PER® is required by ACCME to resolve all COI. PER® has identified and resolved all COI prior to the start of this activity by using a multistep process.

Off-Label Disclosure and Disclaimer

This CME activity may or may not discuss investigational, unapproved, or off-label use of drugs. Participants are advised to consult prescribing information for any products discussed. The information provided in this CME activity is for continuing medical and nursing education purposes only, and is not meant to substitute for the independent clinical judgment of a physician relative to diagnostic, treatment, or management options for a specific patient’s medical condition. The opinions expressed in the content are solely those of the individual faculty members and do not reflect those of PER®.

PER Pulse Recap™

PER Pulse Recap (1 of 3)

This live-streamed, interactive, continuing medical education (CME)‒certified webcast, Rapid Reviews in Oncology®: Practice-Changing Data in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Rapid Update From Atlanta, was held on December 14, 2017. Expert faculty joined Richard Stone, MD, to discuss the implications and applications of groundbreaking data in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presented at the 2017 American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting in December 2017.
 
This first of 3 PER Pulse™ Recaps summarizing the online webcast focuses on advances in the use of FLT3-targeted agents in the treatment of patients with AML. Below are some highlights from the activity featuring Dr. Stone:
  • A recap of the C10603/RATIFY trial, data from which supported the approval of midostaurin in combination with chemotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed, FLT3-positive AML
  • New data derived from the RATIFY trial that were presented at the ASH 2017 Annual Meeting, including prognostic effects of NPM/FLT3-ITD mutations, outcomes associated with use of midostaurin as maintenance therapy, and predicting sensitivity to midostaurin
  • Long-term follow-up (6.5 years) data from the phase II SORAML trial that analyzed the addition of sorafenib to standard chemotherapy in patients age ≤60 years with newly diagnosed AML, demonstrating a sustained event-free survival benefit in the sorafenib arm versus placebo (respectively, 26 months vs 9 months; HR, 0.68; P =.01)
  • Promising data from early-phase clinical trials examining specific FLT3 inhibitors, including gilteritinib plus chemotherapy (phase I; newly diagnosed AML); quizartinib with azacitidine or low-dose cytarabine (phase I/II; FLT3-ITD positive; 0-1 prior regimens); and crenolanib plus chemotherapy (phase II; newly diagnosed, FLT3-positive AML)
“We have one approved agent, a multikinase inhibitor with standard 3+7. We have other agents—crenolanib, gilteritinib, and quizartinib—which are more specific and are being tested alone and with chemotherapy. We’ll have to wait and see what turns out to be any improvement over midostaurin plus chemotherapy. FLT3 inhibition in FLT3-mutant patients and maybe in some of the non-specific drugs and in wild-type patients may be efficacious.” 
 — Richard Stone, MD

PER Pulse Recap (2 of 3)

As a follow-up to this live-streamed, interactive, continuing medical education (CME)‒certified webcast, Rapid Reviews in Oncology®: Practice-Changing Data in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Rapid Update From Atlanta, held on December 14, 2017, in Atlanta, GA, this second of 3 PER Pulse™ Recaps summarizing the online program focuses on new data on developments in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) inhibition in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Below are some highlights from the activity featuring Dr. Stein:
  • Phase I/II trial data presented during the American Society of Hematology 2017 Annual Meeting of IDH2 inhibitor enasidenib as first-line monotherapy in older patients with IDH2-mutated AML, suggesting that this is a viable option for older patients who are unwilling or unable to receive intensive cytotoxic therapy
  • New ivosidenib data, including promising results from the phase I trial of the single-agent IDH1 inhibitor in a cohort of patients with previously treated, relapsed/refractory (R/R), IDH1-mutated AML and an analysis of molecular responses in patients with untreated versus R/R AML who received ivosidenib
  • Preliminary results from a phase Ib/II trial of combination therapy with azacitidine plus enasidenib or ivosidenib for patients with newly diagnosed IDH-mutated AML who were not eligible for intensive chemotherapy
  • Safety data from a phase I trial analyzing standard induction therapy with ivosidenib or enasidenib in patients with newly diagnosed AML
“When you look at the resistance patterns in patients who received single-agent FLT3 inhibitors, you see the appearance of RAS mutations and IDH2 mutations. When you give patients IDH inhibitors, the FLT3-mutant patients and the RAS-mutant patients aren’t as likely to respond. It’s emerging that there’s a triad of receptor tyrosine kinase pathway mutations that are all important in causing resistance to these inhibitors.”
 — Eytan M. Stein, MD

PER Pulse Recap (3 of 3)

As a follow-up to this live-streamed, interactive, continuing medical education (CME)‒certified webcast, Rapid Reviews in Oncology®: Practice-Changing Data in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Rapid Update From Atlanta, held on December 14, 2017, in Atlanta, GA, this third of 3 PER Pulse™ Recaps summarizing the online program focuses on new data supporting the expanding landscape of therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), including immunotherapy. Below are some highlights from the activity featuring Dr. Daver:
  • Results presented at the American Society for Hematology 2017 Annual Meeting from a preclinical analysis of immune cells and checkpoint expression in AML that provided rationale for further investigations of checkpoint inhibitors for this disease
  • Results from trials demonstrating activity of the PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab in combination with standard therapies
    • Phase II study of nivolumab plus cytarabine/idarubicin induction chemotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed AML
    • Phase Ib/II study of nivolumab plus azacitidine for relapsed/refractory (R/R) and frontline AML
  • Emerging phase I data on CD123-specific chimeric antigen receptor T cells and bispecific monoclonal antibodies in R/R AML, including flotetuzumab (CD123-CD3)
“The hope is, especially for the higher-risk diseases such as the TP53 complex cytogenetics where we don’t yet have very good active, targeted therapies, maybe some of these immune therapies could continue to work, and there are some early signals for that.”
 — Naval G. Daver, MD

For additional commentary about these topics and others, visit https://www.gotoper.com/online-cme-activities/rro/ to access more resources from the archived Rapid Reviews in Oncology®: Practice-Changing Data in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Rapid Update From Atlanta.







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