Accreditation/Credit Designation

Physicians’ Education Resource®, LLC, is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Physicians’ Education Resource®, LLC, designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Physicians' Education Resource®, LLC, is approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #16669, for 1.0 Contact Hour.

Acknowledgment of Commercial Support

This activity is supported by an educational grant from Taiho Oncology, Inc.

Oncology Briefings™: Individualizing Treatment After Second-Line Therapy for Patients With mCRC


Release Date: August 29, 2018
Expiration Date: August 29, 2019
Media: Internet - based

Activity Overview

This activity, Oncology Briefings™: Individualizing Treatment After Second-Line Therapy for Patients With mCRC, developed in Physicians’ Education Resource, LLC, (PER®) established Oncology Briefings™ legacy format, is an online interactive monograph that provides treatment strategies for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) whose cancer has progressed after second-line therapy. This presentation features a national thought leader, Ryan B. Corcoran, MD, PhD, who provides key insights.

Acknowledgement of Commercial Support

This activity is supported by an educational grant from Taiho Oncology, Inc.

 

Instructions for This Activity and Receiving Credit

  • You will need to login to participate in the activity.
  • Each presentation may contain an interactive question(s). You may move forward through the presentation; however, you may not go back to change answers or review videos/content until you finish the presentation.
  • At the end of the activity, “educational content/video files” will be available for your reference.
  • In order to receive a CME/CE certificate, participants must complete the activity.
  • Complete the posttest and pass with a score of 70% or higher, complete the evaluation and then click on request for credit. Participants may immediately download a CME/CE certificate upon completion of these steps.


Target Audience

This activity is directed toward medical oncologists, nurses, gastroenterologists, surgical and radiation oncologists, and other healthcare professionals who manage and treat patients with CRC.

Educational Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better prepared to:

  • Consider multiple medication-related and patient-specific factors to determine the most appropriate treatment options in patients with mCRC who have progressed following 2 prior lines of therapy
  • Delineate the appropriate application of current guidelines and standards of care in patients with mCRC previously treated with targeted, chemotherapeutic, and immunotherapeutic options
  • Optimally manage treatment-related adverse events in patients with mCRC

Faculty, Staff, and Planners' Disclosures

Faculty

Ryan B. Corcoran, MD, PhD
Ryan B. Corcoran, MD, PhD
Director, Gastrointestinal Cancer Center Program
Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center
Boston, MA
 

Disclosure: Consultant: Amgen, Astex Pharmaceuticals, Avidity Biosciences, BMS, Fog Pharma, Genentech, LOXO, Merrimack, N-of-One, Roche, Shire, Taiho Oncology, AstraZeneca, Sanofi, Symphogen; Consultant/Independent Contractor & Grant/Research Support: Warp Drive Bio

The staff of PER® have no relevant financial relationships with commercial interests to disclose.

Disclosure Policy and Resolution of Conflicts of Interest

As a sponsor accredited by the ACCME, it is the policy of PER® to ensure fair balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all of its CME activities. In compliance with ACCME guidelines, PER® requires everyone who is in a position to control the content of a CME activity to disclose all relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. The ACCME defines relevant financial relationships as financial relationships in any amount occurring within the past 12 months that create a conflict of interest (COI).

Additionally, PER® is required by ACCME to resolve all COI. PER® has identified and resolved all COI prior to the start of this activity by using a multistep process.
 

Off-Label Disclosure and Disclaimer

This CME/CE activity may or may not discuss investigational, unapproved, or off-label use of drugs. Participants are advised to consult prescribing information for any products discussed. The information provided in this CME/CE activity is for continuing medical and nursing education only, and is not meant to substitute for the independent clinical judgment of a physician or nurse relative to diagnostic, treatment, or management options for a specific patient’s medical condition. The opinions expressed in the content are solely those of the individual faculty member, and do not reflect those of PER® or the company that provided commercial support for this activity.

PER Pulse™ Recaps

1 of 3
Insights from Ryan B. Corcoran, director, Gastrointestinal Cancer Center Program at Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center—PER Pulse™ Recap:
Oncology Briefings™: Individualizing Treatment After Second-Line Therapy for Patients With mCRC

The online continuing medical education activity Oncology Briefings™: Individualizing Treatment After Second-Line Therapy for Patients With mCRC features a national thought leader, Ryan B. Corcoran, MD, who provides key insights on treatment strategies for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) whose cancer has progressed after second-line therapy.

This first of 3 PER Pulse™ Recaps for the activity will focus on medication-related and patient-specific factors to determine the most appropriate treatment options in patients with mCRC who have progressed following prior lines of therapy and the importance of molecular testing as a treatment guidance and predictor of treatment response. Below are some highlights from the activity featuring Dr. Corcoran:

  • Considerations in mutational testing—namely, KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF—as a treatment guidance for mCRC1,2
  • The importance of testing for microsatellite instability in patients with mCRC as a predictive for therapy response to immunotherapy
  • The emerging role of tumor mutation burden as a predictor to response to immunotherapy
  • Treatment options for mCRC cancer and how to sequence them in patients with RAS-mutated disease versus patients with RAS wild-type disease: how, why, and when to use chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and EGFR antibodies to optimize outcomes

“In the past several years, molecular testing—and specifically, mutation profiling in CRC—has really taken on a very important role in the management of CRC patients and particularly in the selection of therapies starting in the first or second line but certainly continuing on in the third line and later.”
—Ryan B. Corcoran, MD

References

  1. Van Cutsem E, Köhne CH, Láng I, et al. Cetuximab plus irinotecan, fluorouracil, and leucovorin as first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer: updated analysis of overall survival according to tumor KRAS and BRAF mutation status. J Clin Oncol. 2011;29(15):2011-2019. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2010.33.5091.
  2. Grothey A, Clark JW. Patient information: colorectal cancer treatment; metastatic cancer (beyond the basics). UpToDate website. uptodate.com/contents/colorectal-cancer-treatment-metastatic-cancer-beyond-the-basics. Updated May 10, 2018. Accessed August 13, 2018.

2 of 3
Insights from Ryan B. Corcoran, MD—PER Pulse™ Recap:
Oncology Briefings™: Individualizing Treatment After Second-Line Therapy for Patients With mCRC

As a follow-up to the online continuing medical education activity Oncology Briefings™: Individualizing Treatment After Second-Line Therapy for Patients With mCRC, this second of 3 PER Pulse™ Recaps for the activity will focus on how to choose the best therapeutic options beyond the initial 2 lines of therapy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).

Below are some highlights from the meeting featuring Dr. Corcoran, director of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Center Program at Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center:

  • How to choose the best therapeutic options after the initial 2 lines of therapy for patients with mCRC and the importance of considering comorbidities and molecular makeup of a patient, as well as potentially exciting clinical trial options1,2
  • Medication-related characteristics that influence treatment decisions: how oral versus intravenous administration and the potential adverse effects play a major role in later-line therapies for mCRC
  • Discussion of several approvals for the third line and beyond for mCRC following the failure of the first 2 lines of therapy and how to integrate them in the clinic

“The choices in third line and beyond are really guided by what additional agents can be potentially useful in the unique setting of each individual patient.”
—Ryan B. Corcoran, MD

References

  1. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. Colon Cancer, version 1.2019. National Comprehensive Cancer Network website. nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/pdf/colon.pdf. Published March 15, 2019.
  2. Tran NH, Cavalcante LL, Lubner SJ, et al. Precision medicine in colorectal cancer: the molecular profile alters treatment strategies. Ther Adv Med Oncol. 2015;7(5):252-262. doi: 10.1177/1758834015591952.

3 of 3
Insights from Ryan B. Corcoran, MD—PER Pulse™ Recap:
Oncology Briefings™: Individualizing Treatment After Second-Line Therapy for Patients With mCRC

As a follow-up to the online continuing medical education activity Oncology Briefings™: Individualizing Treatment After Second-Line Therapy for Patients With mCRC, this third of 3 PER Pulse™ Recaps for the activity will focus on the current National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Guidelines for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and how to manage treatment-related adverse events (AEs).

Below are some highlights from the meeting featuring Dr. Corcoran, director of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Center Program at Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center in Boston:

  • Current NCCN Guidelines recommendations for the treatment of patients with mCRC that has progressed after 2 lines of therapy3 with and without specific molecular features: the role of trifluridine-tipiracil, pembrolizumab, or nivolumab
  • Major findings from the RECOURSE clinical trial in patients with mCRC that has progressed after 2 lines of treatment1
  • How to identify, manage, and mitigate treatment-related AEs associated with immunotherapies2
  • Nivolumab in combination with ipilimumab for mCRC change treatment decisions

“The key to the management of treatment-related adverse events is really the awareness and the close monitoring of these events so they can be detected early and dealt with before things get to a point that can be detrimental to a patient, and so having the communication with a patient and informing patients of what they might expect is very important.”
— Ryan B.Corcoran, MD

References

  1. Mayer RJ, Van Cutsem E, Falcone A, et al.; RECOURSE Study Group. Randomized trial of TAS-102 for refractory metastatic colorectal cancer. N Engl J Med. 2015;14;372(20):1909-1919. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1414325.
  2. Grenon NN. Managing toxicities associated with antiangiogenic biologic agents in combination with chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2013;17(4):425-433. doi: 10.1188/13.CJON.425-433.

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