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Accreditation/Credit Designation

Physicians' Education Resource®, LLC is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Physicians' Education Resource®, LLC designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Resources

PER Pulse™ Recaps highlight key elements of the Oncology Briefings™: Emerging Treatment Options for Patients With High-Risk AML online CME activity.

Acknowledgement of Commercial Support

This activity is supported by an educational grant from Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Oncology Briefings™: Emerging Treatment Options for Patients With High-Risk AML

Release Date: May 31, 2017
Expiration Date: May 31, 2018
Media: Internet - based

 

Activity Overview

Oncology Briefings™ is an online interactive monograph that will include a review of recent data regarding emerging treatments in patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML), designed to aid physicians assessing and interpreting emerging data and novel therapeutic strategies and apply those findings to their practices. This format includes a brief presentation of clinical science, and features commentary by a national thought leader to provide key take home points and pearls for practice that will place the content into perspective. Audio sidebars will provide supporting evidence.

Acknowledgement of Commercial Support

This activity is supported by an educational grant from Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

CME Activity Table of Contents

  • Background and Disease Biology
  • Current Treatment Standards
  • Novel AML Therapies

Instructions for This Activity and Receiving Credit

  • You will need to log in to participate in the activity.
  • Each presentation may contain an interactive question(s). You may move forward through the presentation; however, you may not go back to change answers or review audio files/content until you finish the presentation.
  • At the end of the activity, "Educational Content/Audio Files" will be available for your reference.
  • In order to receive a CME certificate, participants must complete the activity.
  • Complete the Posttest and pass with a score of 70% or higher, complete the Evaluation, and then click on “Request for Credit.” Participants may immediately download a CME certificate upon completion of these steps.

Target Audience

This educational initiative is directed toward medical oncologists and hematologists who treat patients with AML. Nurse practitioners, nurses, physician assistants, pharmacists, researchers, fellows, and other health care professionals interested in the treatment of AML also are invited to participate.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, you should be better prepared to:

  1. Describe current treatment standards for the management of patients with AML
  2. Discuss novel AML therapies currently in clinical trials, with a focus on patients with high-risk AML, the greatest unmet need
  3. Explain recent efficacy and safety findings for novel AML therapies
  4. Review how the AML treatment paradigm might evolve with new clinical efficacy and safety findings, specifically for patients with high-risk AML, and discuss how new data sets may be applied to clinical practice

Faculty, Staff, and Planners' Disclosures

Faculty

Harry P. Erba, MD, PhD
Professor of Medicine
Director, UAB Hematologic Malignancy Program
The University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine
Birmingham, AL

Disclosure: Grant/Research Support: Agios, Amgen, Astellas Pharma, Celator, Daiichi Sankyo, ImmunoGen, Janssen, Juno Therapeutics, Millennium/Takeda, Seattle Genetics; Consultant: Amgen, Celator/Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Celgene, Daiichi Sankyo, ImmunoGen, Incyte, Millennium/Takeda, Novartis, Ono Pharmaceutical, Pfizer, Seattle Genetics, Sunesis; Speaker’s Bureau: Celgene, Incyte, Novartis; Other: GlycoMimetics (Chair, DSMB), Celgene (Chair, Scientific Steering Committee)

The staff of Physicians' Education Resource®, LLC have no relevant financial relationships with commercial interests to disclose.

Disclosure Policy and Resolution of Conflicts of Interest (COI)

As a sponsor accredited by the ACCME, it is the policy of PER® to ensure fair balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all of its CME activities. In compliance with ACCME guidelines, PER® requires everyone who is in a position to control the content of a CME activity to disclose all relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. The ACCME defines “relevant financial relationships” as financial relationships in any amount occurring within the past 12 months that creates a COI.

Additionally, PER® is required by ACCME to resolve all COI. PER® has identified and resolved all COI prior to the start of this activity by using a multistep process.

Off-Label Disclosure and Disclaimer

This CME activity may or may not discuss investigational, unapproved, or off-label use of drugs. Participants are advised to consult prescribing information for any products discussed. The information provided in this CME activity is for continuing medical and nursing education purposes only, and is not meant to substitute for the independent clinical judgment of a physician relative to diagnostic or treatment options for a specific patient’s medical condition. The opinions expressed in the content are solely those of the individual faculty members and do not reflect those of PER®.




PER Pulse™ Recap (1 of 3)
What Makes a Patient With AML High Risk?

The online Oncology Briefings™ CME activity, Emerging Treatment Options for Patients With High-Risk AML, provides oncologists and other healthcare professionals with an engaging presentation on the current and evolving treatment standards in high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Leading expert Harry P. Erba, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and director of the UAB Hematologic Malignancy Program at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, School of Medicine, answers key questions supported by the presentation of clinical science about high-risk AML. This first of 3 PER Pulse™ Recaps from this program focuses on the distinguishing features that make high-risk AML high risk.

Dr. Erba discussed distinct characteristics of patients and specific molecular markers that denote high-risk status, and provided key takeaways as to how this might affect patient outcomes:

  • Patients over age 60 years, as well as those with pre-existing hematologic disease before leukemic transformation, are often conferred high-risk status. Patients with comorbidities or those who have a poor response to induction therapy also are typically labeled as high risk.
  • Cytogenetic analysis is helpful in determining disease etiology, as well as determining risk stratification. Some karyotypes that are associated with high-risk disease include: deletion of regions of chromosomes 5 and 7; translocation or inversion of chromosome 3; translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22; and abnormalities in chromosome 11.
  • Cytogenetic abnormalities may co-present with specific mutations. Mutations in the internal tandem duplications or tyrosine kinase domain of the FLT3 gene are present in approximately one-quarter of all AML cases, and are associated with reduced overall survival (OS) and increased relapse rate.
  • The TP53 gene is one of the most common mutations in cancer and is observed in 50% to 70% of patients with AML. These mutations are associated with a reduced rate of complete remission in comparison to patients with AML lacking the mutation, as well as reduced event-free survival and OS.

 

For additional information and commentary on this topic, as well as audio and supporting text, visit http://www.gotoper.com/online-cme-activities/oncology-briefing/oncology-briefings-emerging-treatment-options-for-patients-with-high-risk-aml .
For information on other topics, visit www.gotoper.com.




PER Pulse™ Recap (2 of 3)
How Do We Treat High-Risk AML?

The online Oncology Briefings™ CME activity, Emerging Treatment Options for Patients With High-Risk AML, provides oncologists and other healthcare professionals with an engaging presentation on the current and evolving treatment standards in high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Leading expert Harry P. Erba, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and director of the UAB Hematologic Malignancy Program at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, School of Medicine, answers key questions supported by the presentation of clinical science about high-risk AML. This second of 3 PER Pulse™ Recaps from this program focuses on the current treatments used to treat high-risk AML that are considered standard.

 

  • Dr. Erba outlined the standard treatment for patients with AML, including 7+3 therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), as well as discussed challenges faced when treating high-risk patients, specifically:
  • Standard induction therapy for patients with AML consists of 7 days of treatment with cytarabine and concurrent treatment during the first 3 days with an anthracycline, typically daunorubicin or idarubicin; thus, “7+3.”
  • The recent phase 3 SWOG trial investigated the addition of vorinostat to standard 7+3 treatment, as well as a higher dosage of cytarabine throughout the 7 days of the cycle. No significant difference was observed in any of the experimental arms of the study, meaning that 7+3 remains the standard.
  • A key secondary outcome from the SWOG trial showed that considering allogeneic HSCT during the first complete remission for high-risk patients was associated with an increase in patients reaching regression-free survival of 2 years, as well as an increase in median overall survival (OS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for all patients, regardless of risk stratification, should be the new norm.
  • Less than 40% of high-risk patients over age 65 years initiate treatment for AML, even though treatment is associated with an increase in OS for patients of all ages.

 

For additional information and commentary on this topic, as well as audio and supporting text, visit http://www.gotoper.com/online-cme-activities/oncology-briefing/oncology-briefings-emerging-treatment-options-for-patients-with-high-risk-aml .
For information on other topics, visit www.gotoper.com.




PER Pulse™ Recap (3 of 3)
How Will We Treat High-Risk AML?

The online Oncology Briefings™ CME activity, Emerging Treatment Options for Patients With High-Risk AML, provides oncologists and other healthcare professionals with an engaging presentation on the current and evolving treatment standards in high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Leading expert Harry P. Erba, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and director of the UAB Hematologic Malignancy Program at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, School of Medicine, answers key questions supported by the presentation of clinical science about high-risk AML. This third and final PER Pulse™ Recap from this program focuses on the emerging treatments that will be used to treat high-risk AML that are currently being investigated.

Dr. Erba discussed recent trial data, including the VYXEOS and RATIFY trials, and explored what the future of treatment for patients with high-risk AML might look like:

 

For additional information and commentary on this topic, as well as audio and supporting text, visit http://www.gotoper.com/online-cme-activities/oncology-briefing/oncology-briefings-emerging-treatment-options-for-patients-with-high-risk-aml .
For information on other topics, visit www.gotoper.com.

  • CPX-351, a liposomal formulation of cytarabine with daunorubicin in a precise 5:1 molar ratio, was investigated in the phase 3 VYXEOS trial. All enrolled patients were newly diagnosed with high-risk (secondary) AML. Compared with standard 7+3 chemotherapy, this treatment saw an increase in overall survival (OS) of about 6 months.
  • Midostaurin, a multikinase inhibitor targeted to the FLT3 mutation, was investigated in patients with high-risk AML in the phase 3 RATIFY trial. Treatment with midostaurin compared with placebo nearly tripled OS, resulting in the approval of midostaurin in combination with chemotherapy in April 2017.
  • Other investigatory drugs discussed included lestauritinib, sunitinib, sorafenib, quizartinib, crenolanib, gilteritinib, venetoclax, vosaroxin, and volasertib.







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