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Physicians’ Education Resource®, LLC, is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

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Acknowledgment of Commercial Support

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Medical Crossfire®: Optimizing Treatment and Management of Soft Tissue Sarcoma in Community Oncology - PER Pulse™ Recap

PER Pulse Recap

PER Pulse™ Recap



1 of 3
PER Pulse Recap

Medical Crossfire®: Optimizing Treatment and Management of Soft Tissue Sarcoma in Community Oncology featured nationally recognized experts in soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Program Chair George Demetri, MD, along with faculty, Mark Agulnik, MD, Shreyaskumar R. Patel, MD, and Richard F. Riedel, MD, discussed challenges encountered by clinicians treating patients with STS, exchanged perspectives and suggestions for improving the delivery of multidisciplinary care, and reviewed current and emerging standards of care in STS.

This first of 3 PER Pulse Recaps from this Medical Crossfire® focuses on clinical challenges faced by physicians treating patients with STS, and how community, regional, and academic cancer providers can work together to provide the best possible outcomes for their patients.

  • The low incidence and heterogeneity of STS poses a clinical challenge.
  • Academic clinicians agree that diagnosis of STS is a challenge, and they often seek input from multiple colleagues. The faculty suggested that community oncologists should pick up the phone as early as possible in the patient encounter to obtain a multidisciplinary consultation with an academic specialist. Academic specialists can help with accurate diagnosis and treatment planning.
  • Obtaining expert input on diagnosis is critical. Dr. Riedel estimates that a change in diagnosis is made for 1 out of every 5 patients referred to him from the community. This is important because, increasingly, therapy is tailored to histologic subtype.
  • With new approvals of agents specific to STS, or even subtypes of STS, it is difficult for community oncologists to become familiar with their use, given the rarity of the disease. Academic clinicians can help prioritize treatments for the community and provide early guidance.
  • A one-time consult with academic clinicians can be helpful in educating patients and making them feel more comfortable about their long-term options.
  • There are few subtypes of STS for which upfront molecular diagnostics are helpful, but for those for which molecular diagnostics are appropriate, involving an experienced molecular pathologist can aid in diagnosis. It is more important to reserve sufficient tissue samples for diagnosis versus using tissue for testing aimed at informing therapeutic decision making.

For more on this discussion, visit https://education.gotoper.com/activity/mcfsarcoma.



2 of 3
PER Pulse™ Recap

Medical Crossfire®: Optimizing Treatment and Management of Soft Tissue Sarcoma in Community Oncology featured nationally recognized experts in soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Program Chair George Demetri, MD, along with faculty, Mark Agulnik, MD, Shreyaskumar R. Patel, MD, and Richard F. Riedel, MD, discussed challenges encountered by clinicians treating patients with STS, exchanged perspectives and suggestions for improving the delivery of multidisciplinary care, and reviewed current and emerging standards of care in STS.

This second of 3 PER Pulse™ Recaps from this Medical Crossfire® focuses on a panel discussion of methods to personalize care and multimodal treatment strategies for patients with advanced forms of STS. Below are some points of discussion from this expert panel:

  • Stabilization of disease is a meaningful outcome in STS.
  • Treatment of STS no longer relies on a one-size-fits-all approach. The timing and sequencing of therapies is important. Toxicities, patient preferences, and comorbidities should be considered during treatment planning.
  • The experts support use of a shared care model between community oncologists and academic centers, and find that ongoing 3-party verbal communication between the academic specialist, the community oncologist, and the patient is key to successful coordination of care.
  • Some patients, particularly younger ones, can benefit from having access to resources available at academic centers (eg, disease- or age-specific patient-support groups and oncology nurses experienced with STS therapies).
  • The recent conditional, accelerated approval by the FDA of a monoclonal antibody (olaratumab) targeted at the platelet-derived growth factor receptor, in combination with doxorubicin, to treat STS is an important step forward for the field.
  • In a phase II trial, doxorubicin plus olaratumab showed an improvement in overall survival, but not progression-free survival (PFS); definitive approval is pending phase III trial data. Doxorubicin plus ifosfamide seems to be associated with higher response and PFS rates versus doxorubicin plus olaratumab, although these regimens were not directly compared in clinical trial.
  • It is important to distinguish subtypes of STS that are chemotherapy-insensitive when designing treatment plans.

For more on this discussion, visit https://education.gotoper.com/activity/mcfsarcoma.


3 of 3
PER Pulse™ Recap

Medical Crossfire®: Optimizing Treatment and Management of Soft Tissue Sarcoma in Community Oncology featured nationally recognized experts in soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Program Chair George Demetri, MD, along with faculty, Mark Agulnik, MD, Shreyaskumar R. Patel, MD, and Richard F. Riedel, MD, discussed challenges encountered by clinicians treating patients with STS, exchanged perspectives and suggestions for improving the delivery of multidisciplinary care, and reviewed current and emerging standards of care in STS.

This third of 3 PER Pulse™ Recaps from this Medical Crossfire® focuses on panel discussion of emerging therapeutic strategies for STS. Below are some key points of discussion from this expert panel:

  • Frontline use of a targeted anti-monoclonal antibody in combination with doxorubicin has yielded an 11- to12-month overall survival benefit versus docetaxel alone in phase II study. This regimen has received conditional, accelerated approval by the FDA as treatment for STS.
  • Platelet-derived growth factor receptor is expressed on both the tumor cells and stromal cells, suggesting that multiple mechanisms may be at play with use of this agent.
  • The approval of olaratumab poses many unanswered questions about sequencing therapies and future combination approaches.
  • Investigators are actively looking to exploit immunotherapeutics in STS. Subgroups of patients have demonstrated response to certain immunotherapies in cooperative group studies.
  • Sequencing clinical trials into patients’ treatment plans is important to keep the field moving forward.

For more on this discussion, visit https://education.gotoper.com/activity/mcfsarcoma.

PER® Practice Pulse
Practice Pattern Questions
How often do you attend society oncology/hematology meetings? (ASCO, ASH, SABCS)
Practice Pattern Questions
What is the most significant barrier to implementing new information in your clinical practice?






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